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Adventure travel to remote locations around the world; mountaineering, trekking and climbing and becomes more and more popular around the world.
People are venturing into the world's majestic wilderness locations to re-acquaint themselves with nature.

The following are normal symptoms of exposure to a high altitude - abnormal breathing patterns at night, frequent awakening at night, shortness of breath with physical activity, unusual or memorable dreams, urinating large amounts.

Acute mountain sickness is characterized by a headache plus at least one of the following symptoms: · dizziness or lightheadedness · fatigue · insomnia · loss of appetite · nausea or vomiting · weakness

The higher you go, the "thinner" the air becomes as the partial pressure decreases. At 6500 metres oxygen availability per each breath-in approximates less than half that which is available at sea-level.


What arterial oxygen saturation [SpO2, %] can person, travelling to high altitude can expect (guideline figures only)?
(rest position)

Altitude, m
SpO2, %
2,800
91
3,500
86
3,900
84
4,400
82
4,800
78
5,300
77

(extract from data of Chiba University, Japan)

Susceptibility to AMS is usually associated with a low Hypoxic Ventilatory Response (HVR)
HVR can be considerably improved by means of Intermittent Hypoxic Training (IHT)